Notary services for English teaching

Notarisation for English Teachers

Are you looking for an English teaching job abroad? If you're a Native English Speaker Teacher then you will findan abundance of teaching opportunities in the Far East, especially in China.

Newly emerging countries like China have generated a huge demand for such professionals. For this reason, notaries are the first point of contact when the English teachers decide to try their luck abroad.

The reason is that the principal duty of a notary is to authenticate academic certificates, diplomas and professional qualifications of the prospective candidates who are being recruited by English schools, colleges or even universities in foreign countries. The award of QTS (Qualified Teacher Status) is now crucial for job hunting purpose as well.

Apart from the above, we are also acting for English teachers (or what is commonly called TEFL teachers) intending to look for employment abroad.

If you find it difficult to find a good employer, we are here to provide the necessary assistance. We could potentially help with the pre-departure briefing of applicants, giving them advice relating to the visa requirements and other legal complexities. Additionally, we can  deliver orientation to teachers on arrival so that they can adapt to the new environment.


Every candidate we have recruited has enjoyed their professional life over there. Here is the story told by one of the TEFL teachers in Southern China:

It's the time of the Mid-Autumn Festival. So we have a week off to have a rest, eat moon cake and pomelo, all foods shared by people in China when celebrating. The supermarkets and shops have many varieties of moon cake to buy and specially designed fruit baskets abound too.

I am describing a holiday, but it and other times of celebrating are important in a Chinese school year.

A school year is made up of two semesters which is important, because after this moon related event, there is none until the Chinese New Year. This means one has to manage the work load and energy levels to last the 20 odd weeks of he semester. That is one aspect about teaching in China.

What about a joy? One is the respect and regard for teachers and the profession.  This is shown by classes greeting you at the start of the lesson, or students smiling and saying “Good morning, teacher” or “Good afternoon, teacher” as they walk by. Think of the movie “Goodbye, Mr Chips” to get an idea. Or the undiluted joy and exuberance of primary school children, coupled with curiosity at seeing and relating to foreign person.

Another is that festivals are very important here and it is easy to be part of the celebrations.  Chinese New Year (CNY) is B I G here for example.  Think of Christmas and New Year combined and still that had not prepared me for it.  Everyone, but everyone is affected and involved; from tv shows, to decorations of buildings and streets, to town centres being quiet as families go back home to their places of birth so that everyone celebrates together.

Another is, providing you have a good contractual package, that the cost of living is lower and so you have more spare cash available to spend.  My focus is to learn to use my camera. Yes, photography is a hobby I'd like to develop.

What makes all this possible? Completing the visa requirements to enter to teach here.  They have changed since April this year. A result has been a few people have not been sure if they meet them. Many questions have been asked amongst colleagues, social media and other sites. Do I have to go back to my country to get my documents legalized? Or can I do it here? What exactly do I have to legalize? Who can help me? I was fortunate when I came back to England because my school had helped as much as it could before I left and the advisor I used in England was effective and helpful too.

The usual advice you hear is true and there are no shortcuts. Find out as much as possible from different resources. That way, you can get the best idea of what to do and take steps in the right direction.